Edwin M. Robertson, B.M. B.Ch., D. Phil.

 

Associate Professor of Neurology

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Kirstein Building KS-221
Boston, MA 02215
Tel: 617-667-5281
Email: emrobert@bidmc.harvard.edu













Long after playing a game of squash or reading this summary, your memory for playing and reading continues to be processed by your brain. These “off-line” processes improve your game and your understanding of this summary, and more generally, enhance adaptive behavior. These off-line processes have, for at least the last 100 years, been recognized to play a critical role in determining subsequent recall of facts, events and skills. Yet, the mechanisms engaged to support off-line processing are very poorly understood. Our laboratory seeks to better understand these mechanisms by using a variety of techniques including behavioral and psychophysical analysis of healthy participants and patients with insomnia, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. These studies provide psychological insights into off-line processing, which are complemented by the biological insights provided by a range of other techniques including non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), genetic analysis and functional imaging. Through these diverse techniques we seek to gain converging evidence for a model of off-line processing, and so come to understand how off-line processing generates creative insights, and consolidates memories.


For a complete listing of publications click here.



Last Update: 10/30/2013